Driving Behaviours are LEARNED

The Messages from the Children and Youth are Clear – Driving Behaviours are learned

This is a old ICBC campaign with some very impactful messages…

Posters of the winning 2012-13 entries are available for ordering and will also be included in ICBC’s road safety curriculum orders for Grades 8, 9 and 10.

Check out the winners, their statements, and all submitted

Your Ad Here 2012/13

This is a old ICBC campaign with some very impactful messages…

Thank you to all those Battling these BC wildfires

B.C. wildfires

August 29, 2017 5:35 am
Updated:August 29, 2017 6:01 am

B.C. wildfires map 2017: Current location of wildfires around the province

B.C. wildfires map 2017: Current location of wildfires around the province

Wildfires burning around B.C.B.C. remains under a state of emergency as more than 100 wildfires continue to burn across the province. This season is now B.C.’s worst fire season in history and it is far from over.

Approximately 3,600 British Columbians are still on evacuation order and about 12,000 remain on evacuation alert.

In addition, the provincial state of emergency has now been extended until Sept. 1.

It was a difficult weekend for fire crews in the interior as temperatures soared past 30 degrees in some areas. Officials were still able to downgrade an evacuation order for the Batuni Lake area to an alert but those residents are warned they could be asked to leave their homes again at a moment’s notice.

The B.C. Wildfire Service has provided a map of where the fires are located (it may not load in high traffic times so you might need to be patient).

The map is accurate as of Aug. 29, although the wildfire situation may change at any time. The larger flames on the map are considered “wildfires of note.””

 

 

Safety Reminders for Back to School

children safety tips on school buses

back to school safety for childrenSafety Reminders for Back to School
https://canadasafetycouncil.org/child-safety

 

Back to School – The Buses Are Back!

August 23, 2017

With a new school year quickly approaching, the Canada Safety Council would like to remind drivers to be extra cautious as school buses return to the roads.

Despite it being an annual occurrence, the return of school buses often brings about episodes of impatience, confusion regarding some of the rules of the road and a spike in fatalities and injuries among young pedestrians from September to November.

With this context in mind, here are a few tips to ensure that everyone, from you to the littlest bus rider to the driver getting them to school, is staying safe on the roads:

  • Leave yourself a bit of extra time to get wherever you’re going. Being in a rush is no excuse for disobeying the rules of the road and endangering the lives of others.
  • When a bus has its arm extended and flashing lights, stop. It’s the law. Do not proceed until the lights are turned off, as there may still be children coming or attempting to cross the street. In most cases,…

School Bus Travel

Research conducted by Transport Canada shows that school bus travel is one of the safest methods of transportation. It is 16 times safer than travelling in a family car per passenger/kilometre of travel. Although school buses have an excellent safety record, mishaps can happen. These mishaps can include instances where children are injured while riding on the bus. It is more common however, for injuries to be sustained once outside the bus, including being hit by their own school bus or other vehicles.

Every driver must remember that when approaching a stopped school bus (on a non-divided road) that has its overhead red signal-lights flashing and side stop sign out, must stop before reaching the bus and must not proceed until the bus moves or the overhead red signal-lights have stopped flashing.

Here are some safety tips to share with children to ensure safe travel.

Getting to and on the school bus:
1. Arrive at the bus stop at least five minutes before the scheduled pick up time. Children should never run after the school bus to try to catch it. If you miss the bus, go back home or if you are at school, report to a teacher.
2. Stay on the sidewalk, well away from the roadway and stay back until the bus has come to a full stop and the door opens.
3. If your child needs to cross the street, teach them to look to the left, then to the right, and to the left once more before crossing the street.
4. Use the handrail when boarding or exiting the bus.

Riding on the school bus:
5. Take a seat as quickly as possible, put belongings under the seat and stay seated.
6. Never stick anything out of the window, including arms or heads.
7. Save food for snack time at school or until you get home.
8. Wait until the school bus comes to a complete stop before getting off.

After riding on the school bus:
9. When getting off the bus: take two large steps away from bus. If you must walk in front of the bus, walk ahead at least three metres (10 giant steps).
10. The driver must be able to see you and will give a signal when it is safe to cross. Cross in a single file.
11. If a child drops something near or under the school bus, they should never attempt to retrieve it without the driver’s permission.back to school safety for children


Travel by Car

Parents and guardians must respect their child’s school safety measures for dropping off and picking up their children at school. Every effort must be made to avoid collision and injury by refraining to create hazardous situations of traffic congestion and unsafe driving practices within the school zone. Respect posted speed limits, and designated drop-off and pick-up areas.


Travel by Bicycle

To ride a bicycle to and from school, children must be mature enough (minimum 9 – 12 years old), and must have enough experience. The rider should be able to scan ahead and check behind without swerving.

To ensure safe cycling, young cyclists must:

  • Wear a properly-fitted helmet, and have clothes that are suited for cycling (e.g. their pants tucked in).
  • Have their bikes fitted properly and in good working order. The bike should have a regular maintenance check-up and should have a bell. It is also a good idea to have a safety flag.
  • Know and obey all traffic rules, signs and signals. They must signal turns and stops. Ride in a straight line in the same direction as traffic and stop at every stop sign.
  • Be predictable to other road users by riding with the traffic usually on the right hand side of the roadway.
  • Never ride in the dark. If an older child must ride in the dark, make sure that reflective clothing and night-accessories (e.g. reflectors and lights) are used.

Walking to school

Many children use roadways to make their way to and from school. Parents and guardians must review road safety rules with their children and the importance of not accepting rides or any invitations from strangers. It is best to walk with a buddy and keep focused on getting straight home.

To keep safe on roads, children pedestrians must:

  • Find a safe and direct route to school with the help of their parents. Hazards should be identified (train tracks, busy intersections, etc.) and a designated route with safety rules should be established.
  • Stay on sidewalks whenever possible. If there is no sidewalk, use the left side of the road facing traffic.
  • Cross streets only at crosswalks and learn to look to the left, the right and then left again before proceeding, even at intersections with pedestrian walk signs.
  • Wait until traffic comes to a stop before crossing. Make sure drivers see you before you cross.

Prevention is the key to safety. With education and awareness, all children should be able to get safely to school and home again. Take the time to share these valuable rules and tips with your children.

Safe Ride Home – Plan Ahead or Call A Designated Driver

Impaired Driving

#saferidehomeBCKey messages

  • There’s no excuse to drink and drive. If you plan to drink, leave your car at home. And if your summer activities involve alcohol, plan ahead for a safe ride home: arrange a designated driver, call a taxi or take transit.
  • ICBC and police across the province are encouraging drivers to be responsible, and police will be looking for impaired drivers at Counter Attack road checks throughout the summer.
  • Almost half of impaired driving-related deaths happen in the summer in B.C. (June to September) and overall it remains one of the top three contributing factors for fatal crashes in B.C.
Keep happy hour happy and plan for a #saferidehomeBC before you start drinking.
Find more tips at http://ow.ly/YBFr30cUmlZ